Mythological Eras: Satyug, Treta, Dwapar and Kalyug

Hindu Mythological Eras: An analysis.

Hindu mythology and also the astrology divides the time period of the World, before it destroys itself (i.e. pralay), in four eras called YUG. The first is Satyug or Era of truth. The second is called Tretayug or the Era of Third. The next, third is called Dwaparyug or Era of Second. The last, fourth is Kalyug or also called Kaliyug. Thereafter it is the time for pralay which means the world shall destroy itself or it would be end of world. By some accounts, minor but huge destruction takes place at the end of each era as well. Since I intend to draw unconventional wisdom from this mythology, hence a little introduction to each era.

Satyug

This was era of truth. A commitment was to be honored with life. One could forego life but not commitment. The hero of this mythological era was King Harish Chandra. He once offered to give a hermit, whatever that hermit wanted. The hermit in turn asked his kingdom. Bound by his word of commitment, the King abandoned his Kingdom alongwith his wife and minor son. As common men they suffered all kinds of atrocities including slavery. The worst happens when Continue reading

Definition and scope of Hinduism

Golden leaves in summer 2013The struggle of summer and springs to capture 2013 is continuing in New Delhi. Summer scores victories during the day but loses ground in the night. More and more casualties are war seen everywhere. Some are captured in above picture.

Some serious talk about Hinduism.

Hinduism being the world’s oldest religious tradition, incorporates all forms of belief and worship without necessitating the selection or elimination of any. The Hindu is inclined to revere the divine in every manifestation, whatever it may be, and is doctrinally tolerant. A Hindu may embrace a non-Hindu religion without ceasing to be Hindu, Continue reading

Live-in relationships or convenient marriage in India with its historical and legal perspective

Manu Dharam Shstra (a.k.a. Hindu Manusmriti)

There is no denying that the ancient law governing this part of land was Manusmriti. It is believed that this Vedic Dharam Shastra is over 10,000 yers old. The documented version of this law of Manu came into existence later. Manusmriti governed all aspect of human life including marriage and carnal pleasures. At the time of Ramayana and Mahabharata, Manusmriti was the known law as it is referred therein at many places. According to Manusmriti there were following eight forms of marriages:

  1. Spontaneous Marriage: Gift of maiden spontaneously after clothing and referencing her.
  2. Daiva Marriage: Gift of a daughter to a priest as part of fee for performing the vedic rites of sacrifice.
  3. Arsha Marriage: Gift of maiden in exchange of two cattle from bridegroom.
  4. Prajapatya Marriage: Gift of maiden When gift is made while addressing both the pair “Together do your duty”
    [Present saptpada (seven steps) marriages including Anand Karaj is a derivative of above four types of marriages]
  5. Asura Marriage: Gift of maiden after receiving the wealth from bridegroom, as much as he can pay.
  6. Gandharva Marriage: Voluntary Connection between man and woman. (Present day love marriage.)
  7. Rakshasa Marriage: Forcible abduction of of maiden crying out and weeping after slaying and wounding her relatives.
  8. Pishacha Marriage: Secretly approaching the girl asleep, intoxicated or confused. It is the most sinful of all marriages and is prohibited.

Live-in relationships or convenient marriage in India Continue reading

Automaton story

Smartness trumped by foolishness.

Once upon a time a nomadic priest came to a river bank to take morning bath in the river. He was alone. There was nobody around. He had to return the call of nature. He had a pot of copper which was his total “assets”. Hence he wanted to hide it some where. He feared that in his absence some thief may steal it. So he found a solution. On river bank sand was spread all over the area. He made ​​a pit in the sand by his hand and after placing the  copper pots in the pit, he covered it with sand. Now to identify the place he made a Shiva Lingam (a Religious Image; See below) over it. Now to make it more authentic, he also placed some flowers and leaves over it so that it may appear that some one has recently worshiped it. Of he went to attend the call of nature. Upon his return to that place, he was in a shock.Now there were so many similar ‘Shiva lingam‘ statute carved on sand. People presumed that on that particular date, it was a ritual to make that image on the sand and perform the ritual of prayer/worship. Hence the people without much thought and consideration followed the presumed ritual. Now the priest could not find his own Shiva lingam under which he had buried his valuable copper pot and had to lose it. Finding himself in this situation he expressed his anguish in these words in a couplet:

In this world people follow each other in passing;
Who cares for right or wrong;

Actions are performed in automatic motion;
Sand ate my copper-ware due to shiva-lingam.

(The story and couplet translated to English from Hindi/Sanskrit Source: Nishant’s Blog)

Shiva Lingam im Hindu-Tempel/AAI Wien

Shiva Lingam im Hindu-Tempel/AAI Wien (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is a sequel to my earlier post on Automatons. How we are lost in our thoughts and are acting mechanically. This story is also reflective of the fact that we plan things from a very limited perspective and future is always uncertain. Fatalists can blame the priest in above story, for his loss as natural because he had misused the religion to cling to his assets. But that is not the point. Point is how our mind travels, in limited two dimensions and we create problems for ouselves and others.