Requiem to Y. K. Sabharwal, allegedly corrupt ex Chief Justice of India

Eulogy to a judge who imposed Martial Law in Delhi in 2006

Mid Day expose of Y K Sabharwal

Y. K. Sabharwal (Yogesh Kumar Sabharwal) was a name I became familiar with when I had started my career as a junior lawyer with a government counsel. Yesterday Y. K. Sabharwal passed away and would be cremated in a short while. Every person has many personas and different people remember a person differently. I have my remembrance about Justice Sabharwal.  Continue reading

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A new trend in judicial dishonesty!

The fact that Corruption is rampant in India is no more a matter of debate but is a matter of fact. Judiciary is equally affected by corruption as any other sector. Almost every Chief Justice of India, who has retired in past decade or so was subsequently alleged to have abused his position to favour friends and relatives. This month celebrates anniversary of judicial Martial Law imposed by then Chief Justice Y K Sabharwal, in respect of commercial/office use of properties while his own children were using his official residence as registered offices of their newly formed companies. This was subsequently revealed by press alongwith the information that the sons of Subharwal made billions from the horror created by his orders. I was also a victim but that tale can wait another time.
Here is a problem of another kind. Continue reading

Rule of law

Konakuppakatil Gopinathan Balakrishnan, Chief ...

Konakuppakatil Gopinathan Balakrishnan, Chief Justice of India, during an official visit in Brasília, Brazil. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Living in a country, which was under foreign rule for over seven hundred years is not easy. People through generation after generation learned that survival under corrupt autocratic rule is possible only through bribe. No wonder that that about sixty five years after the independence the only pan India culture  is corruption. Every office and every institution is marked with corruption. So much so that it is an agenda for mass protests held at several places in the country. However at the end of protests, some of those who were leading  it, had also resorted to corrupt practices. In a democratic country Judiciary is the only institution which can keep the ruling élite, in check to ensure that democracy does not become some kind of aristocracy or dictatorship. For the record Hitler was elected to the Government and he seized absolute powers through legitimate/constitutional means.

Unfortunately, transparency in affairs of judiciary in India is severely lacking. The method of appointment of judges to higher judiciary is most mistrusted system and is under attack from all sections of society including those judges who were once part of the system. (Read here.) There have been allegations of corruption almost with every retiring Chief Justice of India with exception of 1 or 2 former CJIs since the new millennium.  Newspaper staff publishing the allegations of corruption has been sentenced to imprisonment under contempt law though Supreme Court stayed that decision. But the fear of contempt looms upon every individual/institution. In certain ways situation is more akin to the Martial Law. But it is heartening to note that voice of dissent is coming from within. Following news inspired me to write this post:

A bench of Justices BS Chauhan and JS Khehar said if the competent authority found that the allegations deserved to be acted upon, then the President on the advice of the council of ministers could go ahead as per Section 5(2) of the Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993, and send a reference to the Supreme Court for its opinion on removal of Justice Balakrishnan as chairperson of the apex human rights body.  This is the first instance when the apex court has told the government to take a decision on a complaint against a former Chief Justice of India. It is also the first time that the SC has said the government could consider sending a reference against an NHRC chief if the accusations against him were found worth inquiring into.”If the allegations, in the aforesaid determination, are found to be unworthy of any further action, the petitioners shall be informed accordingly. Alternatively, the President of India, based on the advice of the council of ministers, may proceed with the matter in accordance with the mandate of Section 5(2) of the 1993 Act,” the bench said. (http://m.timesofindia.com/india/Supreme-Court-asks-Centre-to-examine-complaints-against-former-Chief-Justice-of-India-KG-Balakrishnan/articleshow/13086987.cms)

Please take note that all that the bench actually said was ‘please follow the law’ as you were supposed to do in case the former CJI was an ordinary government servant. As a matter of fact this order restores Rule of Law by ordering that normal procedure laid down in the Act of 1993 should be followed. It may be recalled that the allegations against KGB is that his kins made money while he was in office. (Read here.)

© Sandeep Bhalla

Seven Sins by Honourable

New Delhi, Nov. 10: Former Supreme Court judge Ruma Pal today tore into the process of appointment of judges to the Supreme Court and the high courts and the lack of an embedded mechanism to ensure judicial accountability.

Pal, a widely respected jurist not known to mince words, chose to put a caveat to her words: she was speaking from the “safe haven of retirement”.

“The process of appointment of judges to the superior courts was possibly the best kept secret of the country,” she said. Judges’ appointments are now initiated and cleared by a collegium of the four senior-most judges and the Chief Justice of India for the Supreme Court and three senior judges and the chief justice for a high court. Since 1993, the executive’s role has been to dutifully appoint those cleared by the collegium. The executive can return the names but has to appoint the judges if the collegium clears the list again.

Seven Sins accounted by Gandhi Ji.

An indiscreet comment or a chance rumour was enough to rule out a person’s perceived suitability for the post, she said. Friendships and obligations also sometimes colour recommendations, she added.

Consensus in the collegium is often arrived at by “trade-offs”, she said, with “disastrous effects”. Pal also lamented the growing “sycophancy” and “lobbying” which colour these appointments.

Pal was delivering the fifth V.M. Tarkunde memorial lecture here. Tarkunde, considered the father of the human rights movement in the country, was a lawyer in the Bombay Bar. He became a high court judge but later gave up the post to don black robes again.

via http://telegraphindia.com/1111111/jsp/frontpage/story_14735972.jsp#

Extract of her speech is as under:

Judges are fierce in using the word [“independence”] as a sword to take action in contempt against critics. But the word is also used as a shield to cover a multitude of sins, some venial and others not so venial. Any lawyer practising before a court will, I am sure, have a rather long list of these. I have chosen seven.

The first is the sin of “brushing under the carpet”, or turning a Nelsonian eye. Many judges are aware of injudicious conduct of a colleague but have either ignored it or refused to confront the judge concerned, and suppressed any public discussion on the issue, often through the great silencer — the law of contempt.

The second sin is that of “hypocrisy”. A favourite rather pompous phrase in judgments is “Be you ever so high, the law is above you”, or words to similar effect. And yet judges who enforce the law for others often break that law with impunity. This includes traffic regulations, and another regulation to which the “ordinary” citizen is subject. Some in fact get offended if their car is held up by the police at all while controlling the flow of traffic — the feeling of offence sometimes being translated into action, by issuance of a rule of contempt against the hapless police constable, all in the name of judicial independence.

The third sin is that of secrecy. The normal response of courts to any enquiry as to their functioning is to temporise, stonewall and prevaricate. As I have said elsewhere, the process by which a judge is appointed to the high court or elevated to the Supreme Court is one of the best-kept secrets in the country…

If “independence” is taken to mean “capable of thinking for oneself”, then the fourth sin is plagiarism and prolixity. I club the two together because the root cause is often the same, namely the prolific and often unnecessary use of passages from textbooks and decisions of other judges — without acknowledgement in the first case, and with acknowledgement in the latter. Many judgments are in fact mere compendia or digests of decisions on a particular issue, with very little original reasoning in support of the conclusion.

Often judges misconstrue judicial independence as judicial and administrative indiscipline. Both of these in fact stem from judicial arrogance as to one’s intellectual ability and status…. Intellectual arrogance, or what some may call intellectual dishonesty, is manifest when judges decide without being bound by principles of stare decisis or precedent…

Independence implies discipline to decide objectively and with intellectual integrity and as the judicial oath of office requires, without fear, favour, affection or ill will. Most importantly judges must be perceived as so deciding, or to use Lord Hewart’s classic dicta that “justice should not only be done, but should manifestly and undoubtedly be seen to be done,” because the belief of corruption is as damaging to the credibility in the independence of the judiciary as the act of corruption.

This brings me to the seventh and final sin of nepotism or what the oath of office calls “favour” and “affection”. What is required of a judge is a degree of aloofness and reclusiveness not only vis-à-vis litigants but also vis-à-vis lawyers. Litigants include the executive. Injudicious conduct includes known examples such as judges using a guesthouse of a private company or a public sector undertaking for a holiday or accepting benefits like the allocation of land from the discretionary quota of a chief minister. I can only emphasise again that nothing destroys a judge’s credibility more than a perception that he/she decides according to closeness to one of the parties to the litigation or what has come to be described in the corridors of courts as “face value”.

…I will conclude with most important facet of judicial independence. Judicial independence cannot exist without accountability. At present the only disciplinary power over judges is vested in Parliament which provides for the extreme punishment of removal for acts of proven misbehaviour by or incapacity of a judge…

Deprivation of jurisdiction or the non-allocation of work to a dishonest judge was resorted to by Chief Justice Sabyasachi Mukherjee when the impeachment of Justice V. Ramaswamy failed for political reasons. Sometimes Chief Justices control a recalcitrant judge by ensuring that the judge concerned sits with the Chief Justice or with a “strong” judge until he or she retires. The situation becomes more difficult if the allegations are against the Chief Justice. Solutions evolved have proved inadequate and ad hoc. There is a need for an effective mechanism for enforcing judicial accountability…

via http://www.indianexpress.com/news/the-seven-deadly-sins-of-judges/874657/0